Crepe Paper Flower: the Cabbage Rose

As I mentioned in my last post, I have been lagging in my blogging.  Proof of that comes with this post for a crepe paper flower class I took over a month ago at Castle in the Airwith Lynn Dolan, crepe paper artist extraordinaire.  Over a month ago!  

Anyway, this class was for heirloom roses, and we made two kinds – the cabbage rose and the Madame Hardy.  Today, I’ll go over the cabbage rose.

We started out by cutting a twenty-inch piece of 18 gauge floral wire in half for the stem of the rose.

18 gauge floral wire cut in half for rose stem

18 gauge floral wire cut in half for rose stem

Then we cut a strip of fringe out of florist crepe for the stamens.  I curled the fringe in between my fingers to round out the stamens.

Strip of cut and twisted stamens

Strip of cut and curled stamens

We glued and wrapped the fringe around the stem.

Stamen fringe glued around floral wire

Stamen fringe glued around floral wire

A few of us, including myself, chose to add glitter to the tips of the stamens for the pollen.

Most of the petals of the flower was made using fine crepe paper.

Creamy white fine crepe paper for cabbage rose 2

Fine crepe paper for cabbage rose petals

We used creamy white crepe for the petals.  (Sorry the color is a little off in my photos)!  We free-hand cut out a succession of rectangles, gradually increasing in size.

Fine crepe cut out into rectangles in gradually increasing sizes

Fine crepe cut out into rectangles in gradually increasing sizes

I ended up cutting five each of eight different sizes.

We then rounded the top corners of each rectangle.

Rounded corners of crepe petals

Rounded corners of crepe petals

Then we shaped the each petal by cutting away the excess crepe to get a tapered look on the bottom half. We added glue to the bottom edges of the petals and stacked and glued the layers of crepe, placing the smallest one on top and the largest one on the bottom, creating five separate stacks, each one eight layers deep.

Stacked layers of cabbage rose petals all glued together

Stacked layers of cabbage rose petals all glued together

Next, we added glue along the bottom edge of each bundle of petals and folded the stack of crepe to form partially folded petals.

Adding glue along bottom edge of stack of petals

Adding glue along bottom edge of stack of petals.  A little goes a long way, especially on fine crepe!

Stacked layers of petals glued and folded at bottom

Stacked layers of petals glued and folded along the bottom

Five groups of stacked petals

Five groups of folded petal bundles

After the glue had dried, we glued each bundle of petals to the stem wire, around the stamens, varying how we positioned each bundle to give our rose a more varied look.

Gluing petal stack around glittered stamen

Bundles of layered petals all glued to stem

Bundles of layered petals all glued to stem

Side view of clusters of petals glued to stem wire

Side view of clusters of petals glued to stem wire

Using a template, we cut a series of petals out of the fine white crepe and glued them around the stem to fill out the rose, overlapping the petals as we went.

Gluing on outer single petals of cabbage rose

Gluing on outer single petals of cabbage rose

To finish up the flower, we cut another series of petals, this time out of yellow doublette crepe, cupped them with the yellow facing out, curled the edges, and used these for the last layer of petals.

Outermost petals all cut out from doublette crepe

Outermost petals all cut out from yellow doublette crepe

Cupped petal for outermost layer. Note the petal was cupped with the yellow color facing out.

Cupped petal for outermost layer. Notice the petal was cupped with the yellow color facing out.

Cabbage rose petals all glued on

Cabbage rose petals all glued on

Side view of petals all glued on

Side view of petals all glued on.  Notice how the yellow color of the outer layer of doublette crepe petals is facing out.

Next, we worked on the calyx, which was composed of five sepals, which we cut out individually, using a template, from florist crepe, instead of in a strip like we had done for the blushing roses.

Individually cut sepals

Individually cut sepals

We made little slits along the sides of each sepal and cupped the wider bottom half.

Cupped sepal with snipped edges

Cupped sepal with snipped edges

Next we glued on the sepals to the underside of the rose, spacing them out evenly.

Sepals all glued on

Sepals all glued on

If I were to do it again, I would cut the sepals slightly longer on the bottom to make it easier to glue them on to the flower.  As it is, there was just a few millimeters of crepe where we could add the glue.

Next we wrapped the base of the flower and the entire stem with strips of green florist crepe.

Wrapped stem of rose

Wrapped stem of rose

To make the rose look more real, we took a skewer and curled the edges of each petal, varying how we curled each one, to give variety to the overall look of the flower.

Cabbage rose with petals all curled

Cabbage rose with petals all curled

Then it was time for the leaves, which I ended up making at home.  The technique to make them was the same as it was for the blushing crepe paper roses.  I only had green doublette crepe instead of florist crepe, so I cut six halves of leaves using the template Lynn had provided us out of the doublette.  I glued the halves together so that the striations in the paper formed a chevron pattern, forming three leaves. Then I wrapped pieces of 22 gauge floral wire with fine strips of green crepe and glued the wires onto the centers of the leaves.  I gathered the three wired leaves and wrapped them all together to form a leaf sprig and wrapped the sprig to the main stem of my rose.  I coated the tops of the leaves with glossy Mod Podge to mimic the sheen on real leaves.

Leaf sprig on cabbage rose coated with Mod Podge for a nice sheen

Leaf sprig on cabbage rose coated with Mod Podge for a nice sheen

I usually do a better job of wrapping my stems, but for this cabbage rose, you can see the varying thicknesses of the stems.

Uneven thicknesses of stems on cabbage rose

Uneven thicknesses of stems on cabbage rose

I’ve learned the key to wrapping a stem is to build up the thickness of the portion above the spot where another stem will be added, stop when you get to this spot, add the additional stem, and continue wrapping where you left off.  That way, you will end up with a stem that is of an even thickness throughout.

Here is the crepe paper cabbage rose, all finished:

Crepe paper cabbage rose

Crepe paper cabbage rose, all completed

Completed crepe paper cabbage rose

 

I think using the fine crepe gave this cabbage rose a softer, more feminine look than would have been achieved with either the doublette or florist crepe.

Since it’s been over a month since I took the class, I probably left out some details in the making of this cabbage rose.  Hopefully, I got most of it, or at least, the gist of it, so that I can replicate it on my own!

Thanks again to Lynn, for another great class!

Do you prefer the softer look of this rose made with the fine crepe, or the more structured look of the rose made with doublette?  Please leave a comment.

 

 

About Serena Y Lee

Serena worked in the biotech industry for 18 years before leaving to pursue her life purpose - to live in freedom with creativity and simplicity. Her love for baking, creativity, and story-telling compelled her to start blogging to share her ideas with a wider audience.

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5 Responses to Crepe Paper Flower: the Cabbage Rose

  1. Jennifer February 26, 2015 at 6:20 pm #

    Thank you…It’s beautiful!
    I have been looking for a tutorial on these roses for months. I have created my own paper heirloom roses but want to see more/other techniques.

    • Serena Y Lee February 28, 2015 at 3:53 am #

      You’re very welcome, Jannifer. I’m glad you found the post helpful :0) Thank you for stopping by!

  2. Jennifer February 26, 2015 at 7:38 pm #

    I should mention, it’s easy to find cabbage rose tutorials, but none for the petalled centers like stated here.

    • Serena Y Lee February 28, 2015 at 3:55 am #

      The credit all goes to the instructor at Castle in the Air, Lynn Dolan. She is the most gifted crepe paper flower artist whose work I’ve seen and is the best when it comes to getting the details right :0)

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  1. Crepe Paper Flower: Madame Hardy Rose | Crafty Creative Gal - October 4, 2014

    […] my last post – read it here – I talked about the crepe paper heirloom roses class I took over a month ago at Castle in […]

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