Crepe Paper Flower: Madame Hardy Rose

In my last post – read it here – I talked about the crepe paper heirloom roses class I took over a month ago at Castle in the Air with Lynn Dolan.  We learned to make two types of roses, the cabbage rose and the Madame Hardy.  I covered the former in my last post, and today I share the second half of the class in which we made the Madame Hardy rose.

As we had done for the cabbage rose, we cut a 20-inch piece of 18 gauge floral wire in half for the stem.

18 gauge floral wire cut in half for rose stem

18 gauge floral wire cut in half for rose stem

Then we cut a strip of light green florist crepe to wrap around the top of the stem wire to form the carpel – or at least, that’s what I think it’s called.  (Sorry, I am not a gardener, horticulturalist, botanist, what-have-you.)

Strip of pale green florist crepe for carpel

Strip of pale green florist crepe for carpel

As we had done in the ranunculus class, we wrapped and glued the top of the stem wire with the crepe to form a Q-tip shape.

Cotton swab shaped carpel of Madame Hardy

Cotton swab shaped carpel of Madame Hardy

Next, we cut out three very small triangles from the same crepe paper.

Triangular pieces of carpel

We glued these pieces around our cotton swab carpel.

Madame Hardy carpel all completed

Next, it was time to cut out the petals.  According to Lynn, we could use either the fine crepe or florist crepe for our petals, but she had us use florist crepe.

Pink florist crepe paper for Madame Hardy rose

Pink florist crepe paper for Madame Hardy rose

Now, I’m not sure if I got this right, but we either used a slightly darker pink crepe for the inner petals and a slightly lighter pink crepe for the outer petals, or we used the same shade of pink for all our petals.  (This is what happens when I write up this post so long after I took the class!)

Anyway, for the Madame Hardy, there were 7 different petal sizes, for which Lynn provided us with templates.  We started out by cutting out a bunch of each size of petal, about 15 to 25 per size.

Petals for Madame Hardy

Petals all cut out

The actual number of petals wasn’t exact because it all depended on how large a rose we wanted to create, something that was better determined once we started building the flower, one petal at a time.

We then took 8 of the smallest petals and paired them up and glued them together to form the innermost petals.

Double layer of smallest and innermost petals

Double layer of smallest and innermost petals

Four innermost double petals

Four innermost double petals

Next we glued them on around the stem and curled the tips of the petals back with a skewer to reveal the carpel.

4 innermost petals glued around carpel
Innermost petals curled back

Similar to what we had done for our cabbage rose, we next took a bunch of the 4 smallest petals, stacked them, and glued them together along the bottom edges to create a bunch of 4-petal bundles, starting with the largest petal on the bottom and ending with the smallest petal on top, like so:

An example of a 4-petal bundle for the Madame Hardy

An example of a 4-petal bundle for the Madame Hardy

Then we glued these petals on around the first four petals, slightly overlapping them.

Gluing on one of the petal bundles

Gluing on one of the petal bundles

Next we glued on a bunch of the three largest petals, starting with the smallest of the three and gradually moving onto the second largest and then the largest of all the petals – making sure to overlap them – so that there were several layers of different sized petals.

Building the layers of petals on the Madame Hardy

Building the layers of petals on the Madame Hardy

Top view

Top view

One thing to note about the Madame Hardy – we didn’t cup our petals like we had done for the cabbage rose and the blushing rose.

Here’s how my rose looked after all the petals had been glued on:

Madame Hardy with petals all attached

Madame Hardy with petals all attached

When we were done gluing on the petals of our rose, we cut the sepals for the calyx out of florist crepe, using the same template that we had used for the cabbage rose.

Individually cut sepals

Individually cut sepals

Then we cut tiny slits along the edges and cupped the bottom half of each one.

Cupped sepal with snipped edges

Cupped sepal with snipped edges

Given how skinny the sepals were, it really helped to use florist crepe for creating them, as the stretchiness of this particular crepe allowed for easier cupping than if we had used, say, doublette crepe.

We glued the sepals onto the bottom of the flower, making sure to evenly space them out.  (Sorry, I forgot to take a photo!)  Then we wrapped the stem wire with strips of florist crepe.

Next we curled the edges of all the petals with a skewer to give our rose “life” and a more realistic shape. It was a lot of work, given how many petals there were!

Curled petals of Madame Hardy

Curled petals of Madame Hardy

(I didn’t do such a good job curling the ends of my petals, so when I got home, I worked on them some more, which you will see in the last photo below.)

We next cut out our petal halves diagonally across the grain of the florist crepe – six in total for the three leaves of the sprig – using the same template we had used for the leaves of the cabbage rose.  We glued the halves together to create the chevron pattern of veins for each leaf.  We then took three pieces of 22-gauge floral wire and wrapped each one with fine strips of crepe to create stems and glued a stem to the center of each leaf.

One of the leaves for the Madame Hardy

One of the leaves for the Madame Hardy

We wrapped the stems of the three leaves together with crepe to form a sprig and wrapped the sprig around the main stem of our rose.

Leaf sprig

Attached leaf sprig

I then applied a coat of glossy Mod Podge onto each leaf to give it that sheen that leaves have.  You can kind of see the sheen on the leaves in the preceding two photos.

I did a better job of wrapping all the stems on the Madame Hardy than I had done for the stems of my cabbage rose.  These stems ended up being more uniform in thickness, (although there was still room for improvement, but I was in a hurry to get everything done, so didn’t take the time to do everything to my absolute satisfaction.)

Wrapped stems of Madame Hardy

Wrapped stems of Madame Hardy

Here’s my Madame Hardy rose, all finished:

Crepe paper Madame Hardy rose

Crepe paper Madame Hardy rose

Lynn also showed us how to make a young rose bud, but I will need to blog about that in a future post for all the buds she’s shown us how to make, but which I haven’t gotten around to making.  So much to do, so little time!

After this class, I’ve now used the three different types of crepe paper – fine, doublette, and florist – to create roses.  Each type of crepe gives the flowers a different look and feel.  It’s really a matter of personal preference and the look you’re going for.  While fine crepe gives flowers a translucency and an almost fabric-like drape with its softness, the stiffness and stretchiness of florist crepe makes it easier to manipulate and more forgiving to work with, and the two-tone effect of doublette crepe adds a different dimension to your flowers.

A big “thank you” again, to Lynn, for another great class!

Which type of crepe paper do you prefer to work with?  Which look do you like best?  Please share in the comments.

 

 

 

About Serena Y Lee

Serena worked in the biotech industry for 18 years before leaving to pursue her life purpose - to live in freedom with creativity and simplicity. Her love for baking, creativity, and story-telling compelled her to start blogging to share her ideas with a wider audience.

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