Crepe Paper Icelandic Poppy Flower Class

I am finally back with another crafty project!  I meant to do this post awhile ago, but life got in the way. But better late than never, right?  Anyway, about two and a half weeks ago, I took another of Lynn Dolan‘s crepe paper flower classes at Castle in the Air.  This time it was for the Oriental and Icelandic poppies.  I had learned how to make the Oriental poppy in a previous class by Lynn, so if you want to check out what we did, you can read the post here.  But here are pictures of the Oriental poppies I made in the recent class:

Purple Oriental poppy

Purple Oriental poppy

White Oriental poppy

White Oriental poppy

A fellow classmate made this red one:

Red Oriental poppy

Red Oriental poppy

Isn’t it gorgeous?

For the Icelandic poppy, we first started out with some florist crepe in the pineapple shade.

Pineapple florist crepe paper

Pineapple florist crepe paper

(Sorry, but I couldn’t quite capture the shade of the color.  It’s a like pale orangey/peachy/yellowy type color.  Very descriptive, right)?

We cut six squares of crepe, about 5 inches square each, for the petals of our poppy.

Square cut piece of florist crepe

5-inch square cut piece of florist crepe

Then we dunked the crepe paper in water to saturate them.  This helps create the wrinkled look of the petals of the Icelandic poppy.

Wetting the florist crepe paper

Wetting the florist crepe paper

Because we were using florist crepe, the paper held up very nicely.  Lynn mentioned that this will not work with all colors of florist crepe, as most colors will run when wet.  The pineapple color was one of the few that does not run.

We set the pieces of wet crepe out on paper towels to dry.

Wet pieces of florist crepe

Wet pieces of florist crepe

To start the poppy, we used a small spun cotton ball for the center.

Small spun cotton ball for poppy center. Notice how small it is next to my finger.

Small spun cotton ball for poppy center. Notice how small it is next to my finger.

We speared the ball onto a piece of 18 gauge floral stem wire.

Small spun cotton ball stuck on floral wire stem

Small spun cotton ball stuck on floral wire stem

Then we glued and wrapped a square piece of kiwi florist crepe over the spun cotton ball.

Kiwi crepe wrapped spun cotton center

Kiwi crepe wrapped spun cotton center

Next, we cut out a strip of fringe for the stamens, using the same kiwi crepe.

Fringed stamens

Fringed stamens

Lynn taught me a new trick.  Notice how the bottom, unfringed edge in the stamen strip has razor teeth-like pieces cut out of it?  This is to thin out the bulk of the paper when the fringe gets wrapped around the center of the flower, making it easier to handle and glue.

We then wrapped the stamen fringe around the cotton ball center of the flower.

Stamen fringe wrapped around center of poppy

Stamen fringe wrapped around center of poppy

Next, we made the star-shaped “cap” that tops the center of the poppy.  We cut out a small strip of the pineapple crepe that roughly measured half the diameter of the spun cotton ball center in width.  We glued the short ends together into a cone and flattened the cone into a disk.

Flattened disk for cap

Flattened disk for cap

Then we trimmed the edge into points to create the star shape of the cap.

Cap trimmed into star shape

Cap trimmed into star shape

Then we glued the cap onto the top of the cotton center of the poppy.

Completed center of Icelandic poppy

Completed center of Icelandic poppy

Now it was time to do the petals.  We took our now dried crepe paper petal pieces that we had dunked in water at the beginning of the class and cut the two top corners of each square to round them out.  To take out some of the bulk at the bottom of the petals, we cut away some of the crepe.  Lynn trimmed one for me like this:

Petal with bottom trimmed out by Lynn

Petal with bottom edge trimmed out by Lynn

Of course when I went to trim off the rest of my petals, I trimmed off too much, so I had to redo them. When I went to trim them the second time around, I ended up trimming them in the razor teeth manner that Lynn had shown me for the stamen fringe.

Poppy petals with bottom edges trimmed by me

Poppy petals with bottom edges trimmed by me

Now it was time to glue on the petals.  We positioned the first three petals evenly around the stamen center.  Then we staggered the last three petals around the first layer.

Gluing on the first petal

Gluing on the first petal

More petals

More petals

Sorry, but I forgot to take a photo with just the first three petals glued on.

All the petals glued on

All the petals glued on

Here’s how the petals looked from the side:

Side view of glued on petals

Then it was time to wrap the entire stem of the poppy.

Wrapping the stem

Wrapping the stem

To make the leaves, we cut out triangles of crepe paper and glued their edges together so that when opened, the striations in the paper would form the familiar chevron pattern of the veins of the leaf.  Using the template Lynn provided, we cut out our leaf.

Poppy leaf

Poppy leaf

We then wrapped a piece of 24 gauge floral wire in thin strips of crepe and glued the wire onto the center of the leaf.  You can read more of the details on how we did all this in this post.

Next, we wrapped the leaf onto the main stem of our poppy.

Leaf wrapped to main floral stem

Leaf wrapped to main floral stem

Finally, we scrunched the petals of our poppy to give them that signature wrinkled petal look of the Icelandic poppy.  You really have to “manhandle” the petals to get them to look wrinkled, as the florist crepe is still pretty stiff even after the dunk in water.

My finished poppy:

Crepe paper Icelandic poppy 1

Crepe paper Icelandic poppy

A side view:

Crepe paper Icelandic poppy 2

We also made a poppy bud.

The center of the bud was a spun cotton oval that we speared onto 18 gauge stem wire.

Spun cotton oval

Spun cotton oval

We shaped it by gently pressing the center to slightly flatten it.

Spun cotton oval, slightly flattened

Spun cotton oval, slightly flattened

Then we cut two petal shapes out of fine crepe paper, each one a bit longer than the cotton oval.

2 petals for poppy bud

2 petals for poppy bud

We glued the petals to the cotton oval, covering the entire cotton with glue first.  We placed the petals on opposite sides, covering the flatter sides of the oval.

Gluing petal to spun cotton oval

Gluing petal to spun cotton oval

Cotton oval covered with 2 petals

Cotton oval covered with 2 petals

My petals were a little too narrow in size, as a tiny bit of the cotton peaked out along the edges.

Bit of white cotton peaking out from underneath petals

Then we cut out two more petals, this time out of green florist crepe.  We slightly cupped the petals.

Slightly cupped green petal

Slightly cupped green petal

We generously covered the cupped side of each petal with glue.

Cupped petal covered with glue

Cupped petal covered with glue

We then adhered the green petals to the poppy bud so that they overlapped the first two petals.

Poppy bud with petals all glued on

Poppy bud with petals all glued on

We wrapped the stem of the bud, made the leaf, and attached it to the bud stem, like we did for the flower above.  Finally, we gave our bud a slight bend in the stem.

My finished bud:

Finished poppy bud

Finished poppy bud

Poppy bud, close-up view

Poppy bud, close-up view

It was another great class with Lynn.  Thanks again, Lynn!

What crafty fun have you been up to?  Please share in the comments.

 

 

 

About Serena Y Lee

Serena worked in the biotech industry for 18 years before leaving to pursue her life purpose - to live in freedom with creativity and simplicity. Her love for baking, creativity, and story-telling compelled her to start blogging to share her ideas with a wider audience.

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2 Responses to Crepe Paper Icelandic Poppy Flower Class

  1. Rita R. January 29, 2017 at 6:31 am #

    These are by far the best step by step instructions I have found. Plus the flowers look so real. Great Job. Thank You

    • Serena Y Lee February 2, 2017 at 5:11 am #

      Thank you for the kind words. Glad you found the instructions helpful :0)

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